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  Ecology and evolution of metabolic cross-feeding interactions in bacteria

D'Souza, G., Shitut, S., Preußger, D., Abdelsalam, G. M. Y., Waschina, S., & Kost, C. (2018). Ecology and evolution of metabolic cross-feeding interactions in bacteria. Natural Product Reports, 35(5), 455-488. doi:10.1039/C8NP00009C.

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 Creators:
D'Souza, Glen1, 2, Author              
Shitut, Shraddha1, 2, Author              
Preußger, Daniel1, Author              
Abdelsalam, Ghada Mohamed Yousif1, 2, Author              
Waschina, Silvio1, Author              
Kost, Christian1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Dr. C. Kost, Experimental Ecology and Evolution, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421906              
2IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421900              

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 Abstract: Bacteria frequently exchange metabolites with other micro- and macro-organisms. In these often obligate cross-feeding interactions, primary metabolites such as vitamins, amino acids, nucleotides, or growth factors are exchanged. The widespread distribution of this type of metabolic interactions, however, is at odds with evolutionary theory: why should an organism invest costly resources to benefit other individuals rather than using these metabolites to maximize its own fitness? Recent empirical work has shown that bacterial genotypes can significantly benefit from trading metabolites with other bacteria relative to cells not engaging in such interactions. Here, we will provide a comprehensive overview over the ecological factors and evolutionary mechanisms that have been identified to explain the evolution and maintenance of metabolic mutualisms among microorganisms. Furthermore, we will highlight general principles that underlie the adaptive evolution of interconnected microbial metabolic networks as well as the evolutionary consequences that result for cells living in such communities.

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 Dates: 2018-05
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: Other: KOS023
DOI: 10.1039/C8NP00009C
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Title: Natural Product Reports
  Abbreviation : Nat. Prod. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, England : Royal Society of Chemistry
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 35 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 455 - 488 Identifier: ISSN: 0265-0568
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110978977979506