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  From cells to systems: Grids and boundaries in spatial memory

Doeller, C. F., Barry, C., & Burgess, N. (2012). From cells to systems: Grids and boundaries in spatial memory. The Neuroscientist, 18(6), 556-566. doi:10.1177/1073858411422115.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-70C7-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B033-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Doeller, Christian F.1, Author              
Barry, Caswell2, 3, 4, Author
Burgess, Neil2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Institute of Neurology, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: hippocampus; entorhinal cortex; space; virtual reality; fMRI
 Abstract: How do we know where we are? Orientation in space is key to our daily existence as we follow familiar routes, navigate to a previous location, or just try to get home as quickly as possible. As well as being interesting in its own right, spatial cognition is also a useful model system in which to understand the neural bases of cognition and memory formation more generally. Spatial behavior offers potentially straightforward correlates of neuronal activity that can be studied similarly in adults and infants of both human and non-human animals. The neural mechanisms of spatial behavior can be realistically investigated in a well-controlled way with the aid of virtual reality technologies in humans and rodents. Virtual reality can thus help to bridge the gap between electrophysiological studies in rodents and brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans. Within this framework, this article aims to translate findings from the single cell level in rodents to understand the neural and systems level mechanisms of spatial cognition in the human brain.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-09-292012-12-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/1073858411422115
PMID: 21959831
Other: Epub 2011
 Degree: -

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Title: The Neuroscientist
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 18 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 556 - 566 Identifier: ISSN: 1073-8584
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954928616245_1