English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Taking turns: Bridging the gap between human and animal communication

Pika, S., Wilkinson, R., Kendrick, K. H., & Vernes, S. C. (2018). Taking turns: Bridging the gap between human and animal communication. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 285(1880): 20180598. doi:10.1098/rspb.2018.0598.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Pika_etal_2018.pdf (Publisher version), 329KB
Name:
Pika_etal_2018.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Pika, Simone1, 2, Author
Wilkinson, Ray3, Author
Kendrick, Kobin H.4, Author
Vernes, Sonja C.5, 6, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Comparative Biocognition, Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Human Communication Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Language and Linguistic Science, University of York, York, UK, ou_persistent22              
5Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_2231636              
6Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations, ou_55236              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Language, humans’ most distinctive trait, still remains a ‘mystery’ for evolutionary theory. It is underpinned by a universal infrastructure—cooperative turn-taking—which has been suggested as an ancient mechanism bridging the existing gap between the articulate human species and their inarticulate primate cousins. However, we know remarkably little about turn-taking systems of non-human animals, and methodological confounds have often prevented meaningful cross-species comparisons. Thus, the extent to which cooperative turn-taking is uniquely human or represents a homologous and/or analogous trait is currently unknown. The present paper draws attention to this promising research avenue by providing an overview of the state of the art of turn-taking in four animal taxa—birds, mammals, insects and anurans. It concludes with a new comparative framework to spur more research into this research domain and to test which elements of the human turn-taking system are shared across species and taxa.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-06-06
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2018.0598
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  Abbreviation : Proc. R. Soc. B
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 285 (1880) Sequence Number: 20180598 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110975500577295_2