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  Stress induces a shift towards striatum-dependent stimulus-response learning via the mineralocorticoid receptor

Vogel, S., Klumpers, F., Navarro Schröder, T., Oplaat, K. T., Krugers, H. J., Oitzl, M. S., et al. (2017). Stress induces a shift towards striatum-dependent stimulus-response learning via the mineralocorticoid receptor. Neuropsychopharmacology, 42(6), 1262-1271. doi:10.1038/npp.2016.262.

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 Creators:
Vogel, Susanne1, Author
Klumpers, Floris1, Author
Navarro Schröder, Tobias 1, Author
Oplaat, Krista T.1, Author
Krugers, Harm J.1, Author
Oitzl, Melly S.1, Author
Joëls, Marian1, Author
Doeller, Christian F.1, Author           
Fernández, Guillén1, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-09-212015-12-102016-11-142016-11-232017-05
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/npp.2016.262
PMID: 27876790
PMC: PMC5437884
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 433-09-251
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)
Project name : -
Grant ID : 452-12-009
Funding program : Vidi-Grant
Funding organization : Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)
Project name : The neurobiology of schemas: knowledge acquisition and consolidation / NEUROSCHEMA
Grant ID : 268800
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)
Project name : From neurons to behaviour: Context representation and memory reconsolidation in the entorhinal hippocampal system / RECONTEXT
Grant ID : 261177
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Neuropsychopharmacology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : No longer published by Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 42 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1262 - 1271 Identifier: ISSN: 0893-133X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925558485