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  Two Ways to Facial Expression Recognition? Motor and Visual Information Have Different Effects on Facial Expression Recognition

de la Rosa, S., Fademrecht, L., Bülthoff, H., Giese, M., & Curio, C. (2018). Two Ways to Facial Expression Recognition? Motor and Visual Information Have Different Effects on Facial Expression Recognition. Psychological Science, 29(8), 1257-1269. doi:10.1177/0956797618765477.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7CA3-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-186C-A
Genre: Journal Article

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de la Rosa, S1, 2, 3, Author              
Fademrecht, L1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 4, Author              
Giese, MA, Author              
Curio, C1, 2, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              
4Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              
5Project group: Cognitive Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528702              

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 Abstract: Motor-based theories of facial expression recognition propose that the visual perception of facial expression is aided by sensorimotor processes that are also used for the production of the same expression. Accordingly, sensorimotor and visual processes should provide congruent emotional information about a facial expression. Here, we report evidence that challenges this view. Specifically, the repeated execution of facial expressions has the opposite effect on the recognition of a subsequent facial expression than the repeated viewing of facial expressions. Moreover, the findings of the motor condition, but not of the visual condition, were correlated with a nonsensory condition in which participants imagined an emotional situation. These results can be well accounted for by the idea that facial expression recognition is not always mediated by motor processes but can also be recognized on visual information alone.

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 Dates: 2018-062018-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0956797618765477
BibTex Citekey: delaRosaFBGC2018
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Title: Psychological Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Malden, MA : Blackwell Publishers
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 29 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1257 - 1269 Identifier: ISSN: 0956-7976
CoNE: /journals/resource/974392592005