English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Auditory Task Irrelevance: A Basis for Inattentional Deafness

Scheer, M., Bülthoff, H., & Chuang, L. (2018). Auditory Task Irrelevance: A Basis for Inattentional Deafness. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 60(3), 428-440. doi:10.1177/0018720818760919.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7CC9-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7FAB-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
Link (Any fulltext)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Scheer, M1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 3, Author              
Chuang, LL1, 2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              
4Project group: Cognition & Control in Human-Machine Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528703              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Objective This study investigates the neural basis of inattentional deafness, which could result from task irrelevance in the auditory modality. Background Humans can fail to respond to auditory alarms under high workload situations. This failure, termed inattentional deafness, is often attributed to high workload in the visual modality, which reduces one’s capacity for information processing. Besides this, our capacity for processing auditory information could also be selectively diminished if there is no obvious task relevance in the auditory channel. This could be another contributing factor given the rarity of auditory warnings. Method Forty-eight participants performed a visuomotor tracking task while auditory stimuli were presented: a frequent pure tone, an infrequent pure tone, and infrequent environmental sounds. Participants were required either to respond to the presentation of the infrequent pure tone (auditory task-relevant) or not (auditory task-irrelevant). We recorded and compared the event-related potentials (ERPs) that were generated by environmental sounds, which were always task-irrelevant for both groups. These ERPs served as an index for our participants’ awareness of the task-irrelevant auditory scene. Results Manipulation of auditory task relevance influenced the brain’s response to task-irrelevant environmental sounds. Specifically, the late novelty-P3 to irrelevant environmental sounds, which underlies working memory updating, was found to be selectively enhanced by auditory task relevance independent of visuomotor workload. Conclusion Task irrelevance in the auditory modality selectively reduces our brain’s responses to unexpected and irrelevant sounds regardless of visuomotor workload.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2018-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0018720818760919
BibTex Citekey: ScheerBC2018
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 60 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 428 - 440 Identifier: -