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  The activity of thalamic nucleus reuniens is critical for memory retrieval, but not essential for the early phase of "off-line" consolidation

Mei, H., Logothetis, N., & Eschenko, O. (2018). The activity of thalamic nucleus reuniens is critical for memory retrieval, but not essential for the early phase of "off-line" consolidation. Learning Memory, 25(3), 129-137. doi:10.1101/lm.047134.117.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7D18-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7D19-8
Genre: Journal Article

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Mei, H1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Eschenko, O1, 2, Author              
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1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Spatial navigation depends on the hippocampal function, but also requires bidirectional interactions between the hippocampus (HPC) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The cross-regional communication is typically regulated by critical nodes of a distributed brain network. The thalamic nucleus reuniens (RE) is reciprocally connected to both HPC and PFC and may coordinate the information flow within the HPC–PFC pathway. Here we examined if RE activity contributes to the spatial memory consolidation. Rats were trained to find reward following a complex trajectory on a crossword-like maze. Immediately after each of the five daily learning sessions the RE was reversibly inactivated by local injection of muscimol. The post-training RE inactivation affected neither the spatial task acquisition nor the memory retention, which was tested after a 20-d “forgetting” period. In contrast, the RE inactivation in well-trained rats prior to the maze exposure impaired the task performance without affecting locomotion or appetitive motivation. Our results support the role of the RE in memory retrieval and/or “online” processing of spatial information, but do not provide evidence for its engagement in “off-line” processing, at least within a time window immediately following learning experience.

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 Dates: 2018-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/lm.047134.117
BibTex Citekey: MeilE2018
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Title: Learning Memory
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 25 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 129 - 137 Identifier: -