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  The timing of hemodynamic changes reliably reflects spiking activity

Zaidi, A., Birbaumer, N., Fetz, E., Logothetis, N., & Sitaram, R. (submitted). The timing of hemodynamic changes reliably reflects spiking activity.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7D20-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-635C-4
Genre: Paper

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 Creators:
Zaidi, AD1, 2, Author              
Birbaumer, N, Author
Fetz, E, Author
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Sitaram, R1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Functional neuroimaging is a powerful non-invasive tool for studying brain function, using changes in blood oxygenation as a proxy for underlying neuronal activity. The neuroimaging signal correlates with both spiking, and various bands of the local field potential (LFP), making the inability to discriminate between them a serious limitation for interpreting hemodynamic changes. Here, we record activity from the striate cortex in two anesthetized monkeys (Macaca mulatta), using simultaneous functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and intra-cortical electrophysiology. We find that low-frequency LFPs correlate with hemodynamic signal's peak amplitude, whereas spiking correlates with its peak-time and initial-dip. We also find spiking to be more spatially localized than low-frequency LFPs. Our results suggest that differences in spread of spiking and low-frequency LFPs across cortical surface influence different parameters of the hemodynamic response. Together, these results demonstrate that the hemodynamic response-amplitude is a poor correlate of spiking activity. Instead, we demonstrate that the timing of the initial-dip and the hemodynamic response are much more reliable correlates of spiking, reflecting bursts in spike-rate and total spike-counts respectively.

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 Dates: 2018-02
 Publication Status: Submitted
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/269696
BibTex Citekey: ZaidiBFLS2018_2
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