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  Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces

Vater, S. M., Finlay, J., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., Ederth, T., Liedberg, B., et al. (2015). Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces. Biofouling, 31(2), 229-239. doi:10.1080/08927014.2015.1022534.

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Vater, Svenja M., Author
Finlay, John, Author
Callow, Maureen E., Author
Callow , James A., Author
Ederth, Thomas, Author
Liedberg, Bo, Author
Grunze, Michael1, Author           
Rosenhahn, Axel, Author
Affiliations:
1Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2364731              

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Free keywords: 3-dimensional motility; Ulva linza; cationic peptides; holographic microscopy; tracking; zoospores
 Abstract: Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a 'normal' manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo 'pseudosettlement' whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a 'hit and stick' motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-12-202015-02-202015-04-152015
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/08927014.2015.1022534
 Degree: -

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Title: Biofouling
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Chur : Harwood Academic Publishers
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 229 - 239 Identifier: ISSN: 0892-7014
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954928593014