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  Where in the brain is nonliteral language? A coordinate-based meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

Rapp, A., Mutschler, D., & Erb, M. (2012). Where in the brain is nonliteral language? A coordinate-based meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. NeuroImage, 63(12), 600-610. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.06.022.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-84CA-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-84CB-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Rapp, AM, Author
Mutschler, DE, Author
Erb, M1, Author              
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1Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: An increasing number of studies have investigated non-literal language, including metaphors, idioms, metonymy, or irony, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, key questions regarding its neuroanatomy remain controversial. In this work, we used coordinate-based activation-likelihood estimations to merge available fMRI data on non-literal language. A literature search identified 38 fMRI studies on non-literal language (24 metaphor studies, 14 non-salient stimuli studies, 7 idiom studies, 8 irony studies, and 1 metonymy study). Twenty-eight studies with direct comparisons of non-literal and literal studies were included in the main meta-analysis. Sub-analyses for metaphors, idioms, irony, salient metaphors, and non-salient metaphors as well as studies on sentence level were conducted. Studies reported 409 activation foci, of which 129 (32%) were in the right hemisphere. These meta-analyses indicate that a predominantly left lateralised network, including the left and right inferior frontal gyrus; the left, middle, and superior temporal gyrus; and medial prefrontal, superior frontal, cerebellar, parahippocampal, precentral, and inferior parietal regions, is important for non-literal expressions.

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 Dates: 2012-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.06.022
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 63 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 600 - 610 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166