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  Biological motion processing: The left cerebellum communicates with the right superior temporal sulcus

Sokolov, A., Erb, M., Gharabaghi, A., Grodd, W., Tatagiba, M., & Pavlova, M. (2012). Biological motion processing: The left cerebellum communicates with the right superior temporal sulcus. NeuroImage, 59(3), 2824-2830. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.08.039.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8894-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8895-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Sokolov , AA, Author
Erb, M, Author              
Gharabaghi, A, Author
Grodd, W1, Author              
Tatagiba, MS, Author
Pavlova, MA, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital Aachen, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The cerebellum is thought to be engaged not only in motor control, but also in the neural network dedicated to visual processing of body motion. However, the pattern of connectivity within this network, in particular, between the cortical circuitry for observation of others' actions and the cerebellum remains largely unknown. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with functional connectivity analysis and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we assessed cerebro-cerebellar connectivity during a visual perceptual task with point-light displays depicting human locomotion. In the left lateral cerebellum, regions in the lobules Crus I and VIIB exhibited increased fMRI response to biological motion. The outcome of the connectivity analyses delivered the first evidence for reciprocal communication between the left lateral cerebellum and the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). Through communication with the right posterior STS that is a key node not only for biological motion perception but also for social interaction and visual tasks on theory of mind, the left cerebellum might be involved in a wide range of social cognitive functions.

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 Dates: 2012-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.08.039
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 59 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2824 - 2830 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166