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  Reduced hydrophobicity of the colonic mucosal surface in ulcerative colitis as a hint at a physicochemical barrier defect

Braun, A., Schönfeld, U., Welsch, T., Kadmon, M., Funke, B., Gotthardt, D., et al. (2011). Reduced hydrophobicity of the colonic mucosal surface in ulcerative colitis as a hint at a physicochemical barrier defect. International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 26(8), 989-998. doi:10.1007/s00384-011-1190-z.

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IntJColorectalDis_26_2011_989.pdf (Any fulltext), 298KB
 
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 Creators:
Braun , Annika, Author
Schönfeld, Ulrike, Author
Welsch , Thilo, Author
Kadmon , Martina, Author
Funke , Benjamin, Author
Gotthardt, Daniel1, 2, Author              
Zahn , Alexandra, Author
Autschbach , Frank, Author
Kienle , Peter, Author
Zharnikov , Michael, Author
Grunze, Michael3, Author              
Stremmel , Wolfgang, Author
Ehehalt , Robert, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Biomedical Optics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_1497699              
2Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_1497701              
3Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2364731              

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Free keywords: Hydrophobicity; Ulcerative colitis; Crohn’s disease; Mucosal barrier; Phosphatidylcholine
 Abstract: PURPOSE: There is increasing evidence that a defect of the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier is important for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The hydrophobicity of the colonic mucosal surface is a measure of its resistance to luminal antigens, e.g. of bacterial origin. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine this parameter in patients suffering from IBD. METHODS: Nineteen patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), ten patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 20 controls were examined. All underwent colonic surgery at the University Hospital Heidelberg. Clinical disease activity was determined. From every subject, colonic tissue specimens were obtained, and hydrophobicity of the mucosal surface was determined with a goniometer by multiple plateau contact angle measurements. Histological evaluation of disease activity was performed in directly adjacent tissue specimens. RESULTS: Hydrophobicity of the colonic mucosal surface, expressed as plateau contact angles, was significantly reduced in patients with UC (mean ± SEM, 47.8° ± 3.4°) compared to those with CD (72.0° ± 5.2°) and controls (72.5° ± 5.6°; over-all P = 0.0004; UC versus controls, P < 0.001; UC versus CD, P < 0.05; CD versus controls, P > 0.05). Between mucosal hydrophobicity and clinical disease activity, as well as mucosal hydrophobicity and histological disease activity, no significant correlation was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest a defective physicochemical barrier as an essential factor in the pathogenesis of UC, but not CD. The fact that no correlation was found between mucosal hydrophobicity and disease activity may indicate that the loss of mucosal hydrophobicity in UC is not exclusively a secondary effect due to inflammation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-03-032011-04-012011
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
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Title: International Journal of Colorectal Disease
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin ; Heidelberg ; New York ; Tokyo : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 26 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 989 - 998 Identifier: ISSN: 0179-1958