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  Hemodynamic response alterations in sensorimotor areas as a function of barbell load levels during squatting: An fNIRS study

Kenville, R., Maudrich, T., Carius, D., & Ragert, P. (2017). Hemodynamic response alterations in sensorimotor areas as a function of barbell load levels during squatting: An fNIRS study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11: 241. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00241.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-B4FA-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-59D8-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Kenville_Maudrich_Carius_2017.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
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 Creators:
Kenville, Rouven1, 2, Author              
Maudrich, Tom1, 2, Author              
Carius, Daniel2, Author
Ragert, Patrick1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Faculty of Sport Science, Institute for General Kinesiology and Exercise Science, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS); compound movement; motor cortex; hemodynamic response alterations; neuroplasticity
 Abstract: Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) serves as a promising tool to examine hemodynamic response alterations in a sports-scientific context. The present study aimed to investigate how brain activity within the human motor system changes its processing in dependency of different barbell load conditions while executing a barbell squat (BS). Additionally, we used different fNIRS probe configurations to identify and subsequently eliminate potential exercise induced systemic confounders such as increases in extracerebral blood flow. Ten healthy, male participants were enrolled in a crossover design. Participants performed a BS task with random barbell load levels (0% 1RM (1 repetition maximum), 20% 1RM and 40% 1RM for a BS) during fNIRS recordings. Initially, we observed global hemodynamic response alterations within and outside the human motor system. However, short distance channel regression of fNIRS data revealed a focalized hemodynamic response alteration within bilateral superior parietal lobe (SPL) for oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) and not for deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb) when comparing different load levels. These findings indicate that the previously observed load/force-brain relationship for simple and isolated movements is also present in complex multi-joint movements such as the BS. Altogether, our results show the feasibility of fNIRS to investigate brain processing in a sports-related context. We suggest for future studies to incorporate short distance channel regression of fNIRS data to reduce the likelihood of false-positive hemodynamic response alterations during complex whole movements.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-02-032017-04-252017-05-15
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00241
PMID: 28555098
PMC: PMC5430058
Other: eCollection 2017
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 241 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161