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  Quantitative comparison of plasmodial migration and oscillatory properties across different slime molds

Westendorf, C., Gruber, C. J., Schnitzer, K., Kraker, S., & Grube, M. (2018). Quantitative comparison of plasmodial migration and oscillatory properties across different slime molds. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 51(34): 344001. doi:10.1088/1361-6463/aad29d.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-E793-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-E795-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Westendorf, Christian1, Author              
Gruber, C. J., Author
Schnitzer, K., Author
Kraker, S., Author
Grube, M., Author
Affiliations:
1Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063287              

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Free keywords: quantitative biology; Physarum polycephalum; Badhamia utricularis; Fuligo septica; phaneroplasmodium; oscillation
 Abstract: The clade of Myxogastria, commonly described as true or plasmodial slime molds, contains more than 1000 species. During their life cycle many of these slime molds develop extended networks of connected veins, known as unicellular (phanero)plasmodia. Among those, Physarum polycephalum gathered by far the most attention of biologists and physicists. Via oscillating cytoplasmic streams nutrients as well as signaling factors spread through the adaptive plasmodial network. These properties have rendered it not only a model organism for acellular slime molds, but also a model to investigate network dynamics, biological fluid-dynamics and food foraging behavior. Here, we studied parameters of plasmodial growth and network development, including chemotactic responses, in three slime mold species: Physarum polycephalum, Badhamia utricularis, and Fuligo septica. We discovered significant variations in chemotaxis, velocity, and oscillatory behavior of Plasmodia among and within these species. Interestingly the patterns of the variations also reflect phylogenetic relationships of the species. In contrast to a common notion, phaneroplasmodia of slime molds develop diverse and specifically organized networks by triggers yet to be explored. This work lays the ground for studying more of these organisms to understand basic features of planar network organization and their variations, which evolved as successful solutions of nature.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-07-302018-08-30
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1088/1361-6463/aad29d
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 15 Volume / Issue: 51 (34) Sequence Number: 344001 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -