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  Socioaffective versus sociocognitive mental trainings differentially affect emotion regulation strategies

Hildebrandt, L. K., McCall, C., & Singer, T. (2018). Socioaffective versus sociocognitive mental trainings differentially affect emotion regulation strategies. Emotion. doi:10.1037/emo0000518.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-EE12-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7940-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Hildebrandt, Lea K.1, 2, Author              
McCall, Cade1, 3, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Psychology I, Julius Maximilian University, Würzburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, York Neuroimaging Centre, University of York, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Emotion regulation; Mindfulness; Compassion; Questionnaires; Longitudinal design
 Abstract: A variety of contemplative practices putatively improves the ability to deal with difficult emotions. However, it is unclear how these different types of mental training differentially affect the use of different emotion regulation strategies. We addressed this question in a 9-month longitudinal study in which participants (N = 332) took part in three distinct 3-month mental training modules cultivating attentional (the Presence module), socio-cognitive (the Perspective module), and socio-affective, compassion-based skills (the Affect module). In addition, the participants completed the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) and the Brief “COPE” questionnaire at baseline and after every module. The Presence module did not notably change the use of any emotion regulation strategies, whereas the Perspective and the Affect modules both increased the use of acceptance. Moreover, the Perspective module was especially effective in increasing the use of adaptive, cognitive transformations such as reappraisal, perspective taking, and planning, whereas the Affect module uniquely led to decreases in maladaptive avoidant strategies such as distraction and refocusing. These findings imply that, a) cultivating present moment focused attention might not be sufficient to change emotion regulation strategies, b) different types of mental practices focusing on either cognitive perspective taking or socio-motivational capacities lead to adaptive emotion regulation via different strategies, and c) specifically cultivating positive affect and compassion can decrease avoidance of difficult emotions. This research suggests that different mental-training exercises affect the use of specific emotion regulation strategies and that clinical interventions should be designed accordingly.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-07-272017-05-172018-07-302018-12-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/emo0000518
PMID: 30589299
Other: Epub ahead of print
 Degree: -

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Title: Emotion
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1528-3542
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1528-3542