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  The Role of Avatar Fidelity and Sex on Self-Motion Recognition

Thaler, A., Wellerdiek, A., Leyrer, M., Volkova-Volkmar, E., Troje, N., & Mohler, B. (2018). The Role of Avatar Fidelity and Sex on Self-Motion Recognition. In C. Grimm, P. Willemsen, J. Kearney, & B. Riecke (Eds.), ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP '18) (pp. 1-9). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-EF4A-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-EF4B-F
Genre: Conference Paper

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Locator:
https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3225176 (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Thaler, A1, 2, Author              
Wellerdiek, A2, 3, Author              
Leyrer, M1, 2, Author              
Volkova-Volkmar, E2, 3, Author              
Troje, NF, Author              
Mohler, BJ2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society, ou_1497638              
3Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528693              

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 Abstract: Avatars are important for games and immersive social media applications. Although avatars are still not complete digital copies of the user, they often aim to represent a user in terms of appearance (color and shape) and motion. Previous studies have shown that humans can recognize their own motions in point-light displays. Here, we investigated whether recognition of self-motion is dependent on the avatar's fidelity and the congruency of the avatar's sex with that of the participants. Participants performed different actions that were captured and subsequently remapped onto three different body representations: a point-light figure, a male, and a female virtual avatar. In the experiment, participants viewed the motions displayed on the three body representations and responded to whether the motion was their own. Our results show that there was no influence of body representation on self-motion recognition performance, participants were equally sensitive to recognize their own motion on the point-light figure and the virtual characters. In line with previous research, recognition performance was dependent on the action. Sensitivity was highest for uncommon actions, such as dancing and playing ping-pong, and was around chance level for running, suggesting that the degree of individuality of performing certain actions affects self-motion recognition performance. Our results show that people were able to recognize their own motions even when individual body shape cues were completely eliminated and when the avatar's sex differed from own. This suggests that people might rely more on kinematic information rather than shape and sex cues for recognizing own motion. This finding has important implications for avatar design in game and immersive social media applications.

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 Dates: 2018-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1145/3225153.3225176
 Degree: -

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Title: ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP '18)
Place of Event: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Start-/End Date: 2018-08-10 - 2018-08-11

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Title: ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP '18)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Grimm, C, Editor
Willemsen, P, Editor
Kearney, J, Editor
Riecke, B, Editor
Affiliations:
-
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : ACM Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 3 Start / End Page: 1 - 9 Identifier: ISBN: 978-1-4503-5894-1