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  Keeping track of promised rewards: Obesity predicts enhanced flexibility when learning from observation

Meemken, M.-T., Kube, J., Wickner, C., & Horstmann, A. (2018). Keeping track of promised rewards: Obesity predicts enhanced flexibility when learning from observation. Appetite, 131, 117-124. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2018.08.029.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-0410-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-DBBC-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Meemken, Marie-Theres1, 2, Author              
Kube, Jana1, 2, 3, Author              
Wickner, Carolin2, Author
Horstmann, Annette1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634549              
3Faculty of Business, Law and Social Sciences, Brandenburg University of Technology, Senftenberg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Reversal; Associative learning; Reward type; Obesity; Active learning; Passive learning
 Abstract: Goal-directed behaviour depends on successful association of environmental cues with reward or punishment. Obesity has been linked to diminished learning success in this domain. In contrast, here we demonstrate superior learning in obese participants independent of reward type. We tested association learning in 85 participants with a wide body-mass-index (BMI) range (lean to obese) in four probabilistic reversal-learning experiments. Experiments differed regarding learning mode (active and passive) and reward stimulus (pictures of snack food and money). Food and monetary rewards were adjusted regarding their motivational value in order to allow a direct comparison of related learning characteristics. Our results reveal enhanced associative learning in obese compared to normal-weight participants – reward-independently for expectancy updating and specifically for food-rewards for initial acquisition. When comparing the influence of continuous BMI in active and passive learning, food reward was associated with opposite effects of BMI on performance. Our data indicate generalized, weight-dependent differences in essential reward-learning, though particularly for food reward. We thereby argue that flexible updating of reward-related information may in fact be enhanced in people with obesity – and, thus, possibly promote unhealthy food choices in modern society.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-08-192018-04-232018-08-222018-08-282018-12-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2018.08.029
PMID: 30170021
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 01EO1501
Funding program : -
Funding organization : IFB Adiposity Diseases, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
Project name : Obesity Mechanisms / SFB 1052
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Science Foundation (DFG)

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Title: Appetite
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 131 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 117 - 124 Identifier: ISSN: 0195-6663
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922648093