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  Deficits in voice-identity processing: Acquired and developmental phonagnosia

Roswandowitz, C., Maguinness, C., & von Kriegstein, K. (2018). Deficits in voice-identity processing: Acquired and developmental phonagnosia. Preprints. doi:10.20944/preprints201806.0280.v1.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-0446-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-1A04-A
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Roswandowitz_Maguinness_Version1_2018.pdf (Preprint), 2MB
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Roswandowitz_Maguinness_Version1_2018.pdf
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Roswandowitz, Claudia1, Author              
Maguinness, Corrina1, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 2, Author              
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1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: phonagnosia; acquired; developmental; apperceptive; associative; voice-identity processing; speaker recognition; core-voice system; extended system
 Abstract: The voice contains elementary social communication cues, conveying speech, as well as paralinguistic information pertaining to the emotional state and the identity of the speaker. In contrast to vocal-speech and vocal-emotion processing, voice-identity processing has been less explored. This seems surprising, given the day-to-day significance of person recognition by voice. A valuable approach to unravel how voice-identity processing is accomplished is to investigate people who have a selective deficit in recognising voices. Such a deficit has been termed phonagnosia. In the present chapter, we provide a systematic overview of studies on phonagnosia and how they relate to current neurocognitive models of person recognition. We review studies that have characterised people who suffer from phonagnosia following brain damage (i.e. acquired phonagnosia) and also studies, which have examined phonagnosia cases without apparent brain lesion (i.e. developmental phonagnosia). Based on the reviewed literature, we emphasise the need for a careful behavioural characterisation of phonagnosia cases by taking into consideration the multistage nature of voice-identity processing and the resulting behavioural phonagnosia subtypes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-06-152018-06-182018-06-18
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Type: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.20944/preprints201806.0280.v1
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Title: Preprints
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