English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Subclinically anxious adolescents do not display attention biases when processing emotional faces: An eye-tracking study

Kadosh, K. C., Haller, S. P., Schliephake, L., Duta, M., Scerif, G., & Lau, J. Y. F. (2018). Subclinically anxious adolescents do not display attention biases when processing emotional faces: An eye-tracking study. Frontiers in Psychology, 9: 1584. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01584.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-09D4-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9CE8-8
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Kadosh_Haller_2018.pdf (Publisher version), 804KB
Name:
Kadosh_Haller_2018.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kadosh, Katrin Cohen1, 2, Author
Haller, Simone P.1, Author
Schliephake, Lena3, 4, Author              
Duta, Mihaela1, Author
Scerif, Gaia1, Author
Lau, Jennifer Y. F.1, 5, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
4International Max Planck Research School on Neuroscience of Communication: Function, Structure, and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2616696              
5Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Adolescence; Anxiety; Emotion processing; Eye-tracking; Individual differences; Pupil dilation
 Abstract: Recent research suggests that early difficulties with emotion regulation go along with an increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders for example. Adolescent anxiety is often referred to as a gateway disorder, due to its high predictability for lifelong persistent mental health problems. It has been shown that clinically anxious adolescents exhibit attention biases toward negative stimuli, yet whether these biases can also be found in the subclinical range of subclinically anxious adolescents is currently unclear. In this study, we set out to investigate this question by combining an emotional Go-Nogo task with eye-tracking techniques to assess attention biases for emotional faces in a subclinical sample of 23 subclinically anxious adolescent girls. This combined approach allowed us to look at both, behavioral and covert attention biases. Using both traditional and Bayesian hypothesis testing, we found no evidence for a bias toward negative, threat-relevant stimuli in the behavioral level or eye-tracking data. We believe that the results can help close a gap in the current literature by showing that like low-anxious adolescents, subclinically anxious adolescents do not exhibit attention biases when viewing de-contextualized emotional stimuli in the Overlap task. Together with previous research findings in clinically anxious participants which have reported high levels of attention biases, our results seem to suggest that attention biases do no increase linearly as a function of individual anxiety level. Future research is now needed to explore the contribution of additional factors, such as depression for example.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-06-132018-08-082018-08-24
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01584
PMID: 30197619
PMC: PMC6117248
Other: eCollection 2018
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : ES/I032959/1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Economic and Social Research Council

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 1584 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078