English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A disassembly-driven mechanism explains F-actin-mediated chromosome transport in starfish oocytes.

Bun, P., Dmitrieff, S., Belmonte, J. M., Nédélec, F. J., & Lenart, P. (2018). A disassembly-driven mechanism explains F-actin-mediated chromosome transport in starfish oocytes. eLife, 7: e31469. doi:10.7554/eLife.31469.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-0C1C-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-0C9E-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
2640104.pdf (Publisher version), 11MB
Name:
2640104.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Bun, P., Author
Dmitrieff, S., Author
Belmonte, J. M., Author
Nédélec, F. J., Author
Lenart, P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Oocytes, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_2640691              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Patiria miniata; actin dynamics; cell biology; cell division; contractility; cytoskeleton; oocyte meiosis
 Abstract: While contraction of sarcomeric actomyosin assemblies is well understood, this is not the case for disordered networks of actin filaments (F-actin) driving diverse essential processes in animal cells. For example, at the onset of meiosis in starfish oocytes a contractile F-actin network forms in the nuclear region transporting embedded chromosomes to the assembling microtubule spindle. Here, we addressed the mechanism driving contraction of this 3D disordered F-actin network by comparing quantitative observations to computational models. We analyzed 3D chromosome trajectories and imaged filament dynamics to monitor network behavior under various physical and chemical perturbations. We found no evidence of myosin activity driving network contractility. Instead, our observations are well explained by models based on a disassembly-driven contractile mechanism. We reconstitute this disassembly-based contractile system in silico revealing a simple architecture that robustly drives chromosome transport to prevent aneuploidy in the large oocyte, a prerequisite for normal embryonic development.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-01-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.31469
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 27 Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: e31469 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -