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  Mouse primary visual cortex in not part of the reverberant neural circuitry critical for visual perception

Watanabe, M., Nagaoka, S., Kirchberger, L., Poyraz, E., Lowe, S., Uysal, B., et al. (submitted). Mouse primary visual cortex in not part of the reverberant neural circuitry critical for visual perception.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-1169-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-7E0A-7
Genre: Journal Article

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Watanabe, M1, Author              
Nagaoka, S1, Author              
Kirchberger, L1, Author              
Poyraz, E1, Author              
Lowe, S, Author
Uysal, B, Author
Vaiceliunaite, A, Author
Totah, NK1, Author              
Logothetis, NK2, Author              
Busse, L, Author
Katzner, S, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Attention allows our brain to focus its limited resources on a given task. It does so by selective modulation of neural activity and of functional connectivity (FC) across brain-wide networks. While there is extensive literature on activity changes, surprisingly few studies examined brain-wide FC modulations that can be cleanly attributed to attention compared to matched visual processing. In contrast to prior approaches, we used an ultra-long trial design that avoided transients from trial onsets, included slow fluctuations (< 0.1 Hz) that carry important information on FC, and allowed for frequency-segregated analyses. We found that FC derived from long blocks had a nearly two-fold higher gain compared to FC derived from traditional (short) block designs. Second, attention enhanced intrinsic (negative or positive) correlations across networks, such as between the default-mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN), and the visual system (VIS). In contrast attention de-correlated the intrinsically correlated visual regions. Third, the de-correlation within VIS was driven primarily by high frequencies, whereas the increase in DAN-VIS predominantly by low frequencies. These results pinpoint two fundamentally distinct effects of attention on connectivity. Information flow increases between distinct large-scale networks, and de-correlation within sensory cortex indicates decreased redundancy.

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 Dates: 2017-12
 Publication Status: Submitted
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Title: Nature Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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