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  The Role of Visual Information in Body Size Estimation

Thaler, A., Geuss, M., & Mohler, B. (2018). The Role of Visual Information in Body Size Estimation. i-Perception, 9(5), 1-16. doi:10.1177/2041669518796853.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-124B-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-124C-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Thaler, A1, 2, Author              
Geuss, MN1, 2, Author              
Mohler, BJ1, 2, Author              
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1Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528693              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The conscious representation of our physical appearance is important for many aspects of everyday life. Here, we asked whether different visual experiences of our bodies influence body width estimates. In Experiment 1, width estimates of three body parts (foot, hips, and shoulders) without any visual access were compared to estimates with visual feedback available in a mirror or from a first-person perspective. In the no visual access and mirror condition, participants additionally estimated their head width. There was no influence of viewing condition on body part width estimates. Consistent with previous research, all body part widths were overestimated with greater overestimation of hip and head width. In Experiment 2, participants estimated the size of unfamiliar noncorporeal objects to test whether this overestimation was partially due to the metric body size estimation method or our experimental conditions. Object width was overestimated with visual feedback in a mirror available as compared to when directly looking at the object, but only for objects placed at shoulder and head height. We conclude that at least some of the overestimation of body part width seems to be body specific and occurs regardless of the visual information provided about the own body.

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 Dates: 2018-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/2041669518796853
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Title: i-Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 16 Identifier: -