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  How Do Humans Detect Landmark Instability During Navigation?

Zhao, M., & Warren, W. (2011). How Do Humans Detect Landmark Instability During Navigation?. Poster presented at 52nd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle, WA, USA.

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Zhao, M1, Author              
Warren, WH, Author
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1Brown University , ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: We investigate a paradox in human navigation: since path integration is imprecise, we rely on stable landmarks – but then how do we detect landmark instability? Participants performed a triangle completion task in an ambulatory virtual environment. Landmark stability was manipulated by covertly shifting local landmarks prior to the home-bound leg by an angle randomly sampled from a Gaussian distribution with a SD of 1, 2, or 3 times the SD of path integration. Participants followed the landmarks in the high and medium stability conditions, but not in the low stability condition. Thus, path integration is a very coarse reference system that can only detect highly unstable landmarks, whereas global orientation cues may be more sensitive to landmark stability. We are currently testing whether fixed global orientation cues (virtual mountains 800 m away) improve the detection of landmark instability.

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 Dates: 2011-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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Title: 52nd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society
Place of Event: Seattle, WA, USA
Start-/End Date: 2011-11-03 - 2011-11-06

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Title: Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 Sequence Number: 1032 Start / End Page: 78 Identifier: -