English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Faster processing of moving compared with flashed bars in awake macaque V1 provides a neural correlate of the flash lag illusion

Subramaniyan, M., Ecker, A., Patel, S., Cottonq, R., Bethge, M., Pitkow, X., et al. (2018). Faster processing of moving compared with flashed bars in awake macaque V1 provides a neural correlate of the flash lag illusion. Journal of Neurophysiology, 120(5), 2430-2452. doi:10.1152/jn.00792.2017.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-677D-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-677E-E
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Subramaniyan, M, Author
Ecker, AS, Author              
Patel, SS, Author
Cottonq, RJ, Author
Bethge, M1, 2, Author              
Pitkow, X, Author
Berens, P, Author              
Tolias, AS, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Research Group Computational Vision and Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497805              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: When the brain has determined the position of a moving object, because of anatomical and processing delays the object will have already moved to a new location. Given the statistical regularities present in natural motion, the brain may have acquired compensatory mechanisms to minimize the mismatch between the perceived and real positions of moving objects. A well-known visual illusion—the flash lag effect—points toward such a possibility. Although many psychophysical models have been suggested to explain this illusion, their predictions have not been tested at the neural level, particularly in a species of animal known to perceive the illusion. To this end, we recorded neural responses to flashed and moving bars from primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, fixating macaque monkeys. We found that the response latency to moving bars of varying speed, motion direction, and luminance was shorter than that to flashes, in a manner that is consistent with psychophysical results. At the level of V1, our results support the differential latency model positing that flashed and moving bars have different latencies. As we found a neural correlate of the illusion in passively fixating monkeys, our results also suggest that judging the instantaneous position of the moving bar at the time of flash—as required by the postdiction/motion-biasing model—may not be necessary for observing a neural correlate of the illusion. Our results also suggest that the brain may have evolved mechanisms to process moving stimuli faster and closer to real time compared with briefly appearing stationary stimuli.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2011-102018-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1152/jn.00792.2017
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Neurophysiology
  Other : J. Neurophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Bethesda, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 120 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2430 - 2452 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-3077
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925416959