English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  One man's trash is another man's treasure—the effect of bacteria on phytoplankton–zooplankton interactions in chemostat systems

Raatz, M., Schälicke, S., Sieber, M., Wacker, A., & Gaedke, U. (2018). One man's trash is another man's treasure—the effect of bacteria on phytoplankton–zooplankton interactions in chemostat systems. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 16(10), 629-639. doi:10.1002/lom3.10269.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-693F-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-6940-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Raatz, M., Author
Schälicke, S., Author
Sieber, M.1, Author              
Wacker, A., Author
Gaedke, U., Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Chemostat experiments are employed to study predator–prey and other trophic interactions, frequently using phytoplankton–zooplankton systems. These experiments often use population dynamics as fingerprints of ecological and evolutionary processes, assuming that the contributions of all major actors to these dynamics are known. However, bacteria are often neglected although they are frequently present. We argue that even without external carbon input bacteria may affect the experimental outcomes depending on experimental conditions and the physiological traits of bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton. Using a static carbon flux model and a dynamic simulation model, we predict the minimum and maximum impact of bacteria on phytoplankton–zooplankton population dynamics. Under bacteria-suppressing conditions, we find that the effect of bacteria is indeed negligible and their omission justified. Under bacteria-favoring conditions, however, bacteria may strongly affect average biomasses of phytoplankton and zooplankton. The population dynamics may become highly complex, which may result in wrong interpretations when inferring processes (e.g., trait changes) from population dynamic patterns without considering bacteria. We provide suggestions to reduce the bacterial impact experimentally. Besides optimizing experimental conditions (e.g., the dilution rate) the appropriate choice of the zooplankton predator is decisive. Counterintuitively, bacteria have a larger impact if the predator is not bacterivorous as high bacterial biomasses and complex population dynamics arise via competition for nutrients with the phytoplankton. Only at least partial bacterivory minimizes the impact of bacteria. Our results help to improve the design of chemostat experiments and their interpretation, and advance the study of ecological and evolutionary processes in aquatic food webs. © 2018 Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-04-262018-07-092018-09-102018-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/lom3.10269
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
Grant ID : GA 401/26‐1WA 2445/11‐1WA 2445/8‐2
Funding program : -
Funding organization : -

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods
  Other : Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Waco, Tex. : American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 629 - 639 Identifier: ISSN: 1541-5856
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042728183802