English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Cortical Activation during Clock Reading as a Quadratic Function of Dementia State

Saur, R., Milian, M., Erb, M., Eschweiler, G., Grodd, W., & Leyhe, T. (2010). Cortical Activation during Clock Reading as a Quadratic Function of Dementia State. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 22(1), 267-284. doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-091390.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-6ACE-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-02C5-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Saur, R, Author
Milian, M, Author
Erb, M1, Author              
Eschweiler, G, Author              
Grodd, W1, Author              
Leyhe, T, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuroimaging studies have demonstrated decreased brain activation, while increased activation was detected in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). It can be hypothesized that increased cerebral activity seen in patients with MCI reflects neural compensation at the beginning of neurodegenerative processes. Later, as patients develop AD, neural integrity is increasingly impaired. This is accompanied by decreased neural activation. In this study we examined cognitive performance and functional magnetic resonance imaging activation on a Clock Reading task (CRT) and a Spatial Control task (SCT) in healthy controls, patients with MCI, and patients with early AD. Correlations between neural-functional activation and cognitive state, measured by the Mini Mental Status Examination, were determined using rank, linear and quadratic correlation models. It could be shown that CRT, in comparison to SCT, specifically activates brain regions in the ventral visual stream and precuneus known to be involved in conceptual processing and spatial imagery. The correlation between brain activity and cognitive state followed a quadratic rather than a linear pattern in several brain regions, including the lingual gyrus, cuneus, and precuneus. The strongest brain activity was found in patients with MCI and less severely impaired early AD subjects. These findings support the hypothesis that patients in early stages of dementia compensate for neuronal loss by the recruitment of additional neural resources reflected by increased neural activation, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent signal.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2010-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3233/JAD-2010-091390
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
  Abbreviation : J. Alzheimers Dis.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : IOS Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 267 - 284 Identifier: ISSN: 1387-2877
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1387-2877