English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Sleep counteracts aging phenotypes to survive starvation-induced developmental arrest in C. elegans.

Wu, Y., Masurat, F., Preis, J., & Bringmann, H. (2018). Sleep counteracts aging phenotypes to survive starvation-induced developmental arrest in C. elegans. Current Biology, 28(22), 3610-3624. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.10.009.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-77EA-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C236-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
3008319.pdf (Publisher version), 5MB
Name:
3008319.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
:
3008319_Suppl_1.pdf (Supplementary material), 5MB
Name:
3008319_Suppl_1.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-
:
3008319_Suppl_2.pdf (Supplementary material), 10MB
Name:
3008319_Suppl_2.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Wu, Y.1, Author              
Masurat, F.1, Author              
Preis, J.1, Author              
Bringmann, H.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Sleep and Waking, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578607              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: sleep; aging; developmental arrest; starvation; Caenorhabditis elegans; FoxO; IIS signaling
 Abstract: Sleep is ancient and fulfills higher brain functions as well as basic vital processes. Little is known about how sleep emerged in evolution and what essential functions it was selected for. Here, we investigated sleep in Caenorhabditis elegans across developmental stages and physiological conditions to find out when and how sleep in a simple animal becomes essential for survival. We found that sleep in worms occurs during most stages and physiological conditions and is typically induced by the sleep-active RIS neuron. Food quality and availability determine sleep amount. Extended starvation, which induces developmental arrest in larvae, presents a major sleep trigger. Conserved nutrient-sensing regulators of longevity and developmental arrest, AMP-activated kinase and FoxO, act in parallel to induce sleep during extended food deprivation. These metabolic factors can act in multiple tissues to signal starvation to RIS. Although sleep does not appear to be essential for a normal adult lifespan, it is crucial for survival of starvation-induced developmental arrest in larvae. Rather than merely saving energy for later use, sleep counteracts the progression of aging phenotypes, perhaps by allocating resources. Thus, sleep presents a protective anti-aging program that is induced by nutrient-sensing longevity pathways to survive starvation-induced developmental arrest. All organisms are threatened with the possibility of experienced famine in their life, which suggests that the molecular coupling of starvation, development, aging, and sleep was selected for early in the evolution of nervous systems and may be conserved in other species, including humans.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-11-082018-11-19
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.10.009
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Current Biology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 28 (22) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3610 - 3624 Identifier: -