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  Neural mechanisms of affective matching across faces and scenes

Preckel, K., Trautwein, F.-M., Paulus, F. M., Kirsch, P., Krach, S., Singer, T., et al. (2019). Neural mechanisms of affective matching across faces and scenes. Scientific Reports, 9: 1492. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37163-9.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-9138-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-F8F3-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Preckel, Katrin1, Author              
Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis1, 2, Author              
Paulus, Frieder M.3, Author
Kirsch, Peter4, Author
Krach, Sören3, Author
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Kanske, Philipp1, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities, University of Haifa, Israel, ou_persistent22              
3Center of Brain, Behavior and Metabolism (CBBM), University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Clinical Psychology, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Chair for Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Amygdala; Perception
 Abstract: The emotional matching paradigm, introduced by Hariri and colleagues in 2000, is a widely used neuroimaging experiment that reliably activates the amygdala. In the classic version of the experiment faces with negative emotional expression and scenes depicting distressing events are compared with geometric shapes instead of neutral stimuli of the same category (i.e. faces or scenes). This makes it difficult to clearly attribute amygdala activation to the emotional valence and not to the social content. To improve this paradigm, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in which emotionally neutral and, additionally, positive stimuli within each stimulus category (i.e. faces, social and non-social scenes) were included. These categories enabled us to differentiate the exact nature of observed effects in the amygdala. First, the main findings of the original paradigm were replicated. Second, we observed amygdala activation when comparing negative to neutral stimuli of the same category. However, for negative faces, the amygdala response habituated rapidly. Third, positive stimuli were associated with widespread activation including the insula and the caudate. This validated adaption study enables more precise statements on the neural activation underlying emotional processing. These advances may benefit future studies on identifying selective impairments in emotional and social stimulus processing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-07-252018-11-272019-02-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-37163-9
PMID: 30728379
PMC: PMC6365558
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 1492 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322