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  Growth and metabolic adjustments in response to gibberellin deficiency in drought stressed tomato plants

Omena-Garcia, R. P., Martins, A. O., Medeiros, D., Vallarino, J. G., Ribeiro, D. M., Fernie, A. R., et al. (2019). Growth and metabolic adjustments in response to gibberellin deficiency in drought stressed tomato plants. Environmental and Experimental Botany, 159, 95-107. doi:10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.12.011.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BA1A-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-4686-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Omena-Garcia, Rebeca Patrícia1, Author
Martins, Auxiliadora Oliveira1, Author
Medeiros, D.B.2, Author              
Vallarino, J. G.2, Author              
Ribeiro, Dimas Mendes1, Author
Fernie, A. R.2, Author              
Araújo, Wagner L.1, Author
Nunes-Nesi, Adriano1, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753339              

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Free keywords: Water deficit, Gibberellin biosynthesis, Metabolomics, Amino acids accumulation, Shoot and root growth, Stress adaptation
 Abstract: Gibberellins (GAs) have been shown to be involved in the tolerance of plants to a range of environmental stresses. However, the physiological and metabolic implications of altered levels of GAs in plants under drought stress remain largely unknown. To understand the contribution of GAs for the responses to water deficit conditions, physiological and metabolic parameters were evaluated in tomato deficient mutants in GAs biosynthesis, gib1, gib2, and gib3. Interestingly, the mutants maintained leaf water content over a longer time period and recovered photosynthesis faster than wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, gib1 and gib2 plants showed no apparent wilt even after reaching low leaf water potential (-1.3 MPa). Additionally, mutants plants partitioned more biomass to the roots than shoots compared to WT. The maintenance of leaf water content and consequent increased water use efficiency observed in the mutants can be explained by the osmotic adjustment of leaf and root cells, mainly due to amino acid accumulation. Collectively, our results suggest that plants with reduced GAs content are able to cope with water deprivation by increasing proline and other amino acid levels. This response, alongside partitioning of carbon to roots allows GAs-deficient plants to maintain the leaf turgor for a longer time and thereby promotes water deficit tolerance.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.12.011
BibTex Citekey: OMENAGARCIA201995
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Title: Environmental and Experimental Botany
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 159 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 95 - 107 Identifier: ISSN: 0098-8472
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954928507606