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  Self-propulsion of inverse Leidenfrost drops on a cryogenic bath

Gauthier, A., Diddens, C., Proville, R., Lohse, D., & van der Meer, D. (2019). Self-propulsion of inverse Leidenfrost drops on a cryogenic bath. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(4), 1174-1179. doi:10.1073/pnas.1812288116.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BD75-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-E503-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Gauthier, A., Author
Diddens, C., Author
Proville, R., Author
Lohse, Detlef1, Author              
van der Meer, D., Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063285              

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Free keywords: drops; inverse Leidenfrost effect; liquid nitrogen bath; self-propulsion
 Abstract: When deposited on a hot bath, volatile drops are observed to stay in levitation: the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here, we discuss drop dynamics in an inverse Leidenfrost situation where room-temperature drops are deposited on a liquid-nitrogen pool and levitate on a vapor film generated by evaporation of the bath. In the seconds following deposition, we observe that the droplets start to glide on the bath along a straight path, only disrupted by elastic bouncing close to the edges of the container. Initially at rest, these self-propelled drops accelerate within a few seconds and reach velocities on the order of a few centimeters per second before slowing down on a longer time scale. They remain self-propelled as long as they are sitting on the bath, even after freezing and cooling down to liquid-nitrogen temperature. We experimentally investigate the parameters that affect liquid motion and propose a model, based on the experimentally and numerically observed (stable) symmetry breaking within the vapor film that supports the drop. When the film thickness and the cooling dynamics of the drops are also modeled, the variations of the drop velocities can be accurately reproduced.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-01-072019-01-22
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1812288116
 Degree: -

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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 116 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1174 - 1179 Identifier: -