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  10-month-old infants are sensitive to the time course of perceived actions: Eye-tracking and EEG evidence

Bache, C., Springer, A., Noack, H., Stadler, W., Kopp, F., Lindenberger, U., et al. (2017). 10-month-old infants are sensitive to the time course of perceived actions: Eye-tracking and EEG evidence. Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 1170. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01170.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-C753-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5823-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bache, Cathleen 1, Author
Springer, Anne2, 3, Author              
Noack, Hannes 4, Author
Stadler, Waltraud2, 5, Author              
Kopp, Franziska 1, Author
Lindenberger, Ulman1, 6, Author
Markus , Werkle-Bergner1, Author
Affiliations:
1Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Basel, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
4Institute for Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Human Movement Science, TU Munich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6European University Institute, Fiesole, Italy, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: EEG; eye-tracking; sensorimotor simulation; action perception; occlusion; memory; real-time
 Abstract: Research has shown that infants are able to track a moving target efficiently – even if it is transiently occluded from sight. This basic ability allows prediction of when and where events happen in everyday life. Yet, it is unclear whether, and how, infants internally represent the time course of ongoing movements to derive predictions. In this study, 10-month-old crawlers observed the video of a same-aged crawling baby that was transiently occluded and reappeared in either a temporally continuous or non-continuous manner (i.e., delayed by 500 ms vs. forwarded by 500 ms relative to the real-time movement). Eye movement and rhythmic neural brain activity (EEG) were measured simultaneously. Eye movement analyses showed that infants were sensitive to slight temporal shifts in movement continuation after occlusion. Furthermore, brain activity associated with sensorimotor processing differed between observation of continuous and non-continuous movements. Early sensitivity to an action’s timing may hence be explained within the internal real-time simulation account of action observation. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that 10-month-old infants are well prepared for internal representation of the time course of observed movements that are within the infants’ current motor repertoire.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-04-242017-06-272017-07-14
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01170
PMID: 28769831
PMC: PMC5509954
Other: eCollection 2017
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Funding program : The Max Planck Research Network for the Cognitive and Neurosciences (Maxnet Cognition)
Funding organization : The Max Planck Society
Project name : -
Grant ID : WE 4269/3-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation
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Funding program : -
Funding organization : The International Max Planck Research School on the Life Course
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Early Career Research Fellowship 2017-2019
Funding organization : The Jacobs Foundation

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 1170 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078