English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Primary Visual Cortex as a Saliency Map: A Parameter-Free Prediction and Its Test by Behavioral Data

Zhe, L., & Zhaoping, L. (2015). Primary Visual Cortex as a Saliency Map: A Parameter-Free Prediction and Its Test by Behavioral Data. PLoS Computational Biology, 11(10), 1-39. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004375.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-C27A-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-C27B-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Zhe, L, Author
Zhaoping, L1, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: It has been hypothesized that neural activities in the primary visual cortex (V1) represent a saliency map of the visual field to exogenously guide attention. This hypothesis has so far provided only qualitative predictions and their confirmations. We report this hypothesis’ first quantitative prediction, derived without free parameters, and its confirmation by human behavioral data. The hypothesis provides a direct link between V1 neural responses to a visual location and the saliency of that location to guide attention exogenously. In a visual input containing many bars, one of them saliently different from all the other bars which are identical to each other, saliency at the singleton’s location can be measured by the shortness of the reaction time in a visual search for singletons. The hypothesis predicts quantitatively the whole distribution of the reaction times to find a singleton unique in color, orientation, and motion direction from the reaction times to find other types of singletons. The prediction matches human reaction time data. A requirement for this successful prediction is a data-motivated assumption that V1 lacks neurons tuned simultaneously to color, orientation, and motion direction of visual inputs. Since evidence suggests that extrastriate cortices do have such neurons, we discuss the possibility that the extrastriate cortices play no role in guiding exogenous attention so that they can be devoted to other functions like visual decoding and endogenous attention.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2015-10
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004375
eDoc: e1004375
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS Computational Biology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 39 Identifier: ISSN: 1553-734X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000017180_1