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  Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation does not facilitate dynamic balance task learning in healthy old adults

Kaminski, E., Hoff, M., Rjosk, V., Steele, C., Gundlach, C., Sehm, B., et al. (2017). Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation does not facilitate dynamic balance task learning in healthy old adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11: 16. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00016.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-D07B-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B625-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kaminski, Elisabeth1, Author              
Hoff, Maike1, Author              
Rjosk, Viola1, Author              
Steele, Christopher1, 2, Author              
Gundlach, Christopher1, 3, Author              
Sehm, Bernhard1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 4, Author              
Ragert, Patrick1, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Department of Psychiatry, Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
3Faculty of Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology and Methods, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Faculty of Sport Science, Institute for General Kinesiology and Exercise Science, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: dynamic balance task; balance learning; healthy aging; non-invasive brain stimulation; kinematics; transcranial direct current stimulation
 Abstract: Older adults frequently experience a decrease in balance control that leads to increased numbers of falls, injuries and hospitalization. Therefore, evaluating older adults’ ability to maintain balance and examining new approaches to counteract age-related decline in balance control is of great importance for fall prevention and healthy aging. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been shown to beneficially influence motor behavior and motor learning. In the present study, we investigated the influence of tDCS applied over the leg area of the primary motor cortex (M1) on balance task learning of healthy elderly in a dynamic balance task (DBT). In total, 30 older adults were enrolled in a cross-sectional, randomized design including two consecutive DBT training sessions. Only during the first DBT session, either 20 min of anodal tDCS (a-tDCS) or sham tDCS (s-tDCS) were applied and learning improvement was compared between the two groups. Our data showed that both groups successfully learned to perform the DBT on both training sessions. Interestingly, between-group analyses revealed no difference between the a-tDCS and the s-tDCS group regarding their level of task learning. These results indicate that the concurrent application of tDCS over M1 leg area did not elicit DBT learning enhancement in our study cohort. However, a regression analysis revealed that DBT performance can be predicted by the kinematic profile of the movement, a finding that may provide new insights for individualized approaches of treating balance and gait disorders.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-09-142017-01-092017-01-31
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00016
PMID: 28197085
PMC: PMC5281631
Other: eCollection 2017
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Funding organization : Fazit-Stiftung

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 16 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161