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  Gait improvement via rhythmic stimulation in Parkinson’s disease is linked to rhythmic skills

Dalla Bella, S., Benoit, C.-E., Farrugia, N., Keller, P. E., Obrig, H., Mainka, S., et al. (2017). Gait improvement via rhythmic stimulation in Parkinson’s disease is linked to rhythmic skills. Scientific Reports, 7: 42005. doi:10.1038/srep42005.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-E28D-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B63C-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Dalla Bella, Simone 1, Author
Benoit, Charles-Etienne1, 2, Author              
Farrugia, Nicolas1, 2, Author              
Keller, Peter E.1, 3, Author              
Obrig, Hellmuth1, Author
Mainka, Stefan 1, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
3Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              

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Free keywords: Human behaviour; Parkinson's disease
 Abstract: Training based on rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) can improve gait in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Patients typically walk faster and exhibit greater stride length after RAS. However, this effect is highly variable among patients, with some exhibiting little or no response to the intervention. These individual differences may depend on patients’ ability to synchronize their movements to a beat. To test this possibility, 14 IPD patients were submitted to RAS for four weeks, in which they walked to music with an embedded metronome. Before and after the training, patients’ synchronization was assessed with auditory paced hand tapping and walking to auditory cues. Patients increased gait speed and stride length in non-cued gait after training. However, individual differences were apparent as some patients showed a positive response to RAS and others, either no response, or a negative response. A positive response to RAS was predicted by the synchronization performance in hand tapping and gait tasks. More severe gait impairment, low synchronization variability, and a prompt response to a stimulation change foster a positive response to RAS training. Thus, sensorimotor timing skills underpinning the synchronization of steps to an auditory cue may allow predicting the success of RAS in IPD.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-10-142017-01-052017-01-24
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/srep42005
PMID: 28233776
PMC: PMC5324039
 Degree: -

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Project name : Europe, Brain and Music: New perspectives for stimulating cognitive and sensory processes / EBRAMUS
Grant ID : 238157
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 42005 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322