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  Similar mechanisms of movement control in target- and effect-directed actions toward spatial goals?

Walter, A., & Rieger, M. (2012). Similar mechanisms of movement control in target- and effect-directed actions toward spatial goals? Frontiers in Psychology, 3: 539. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00539.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-EFDC-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-EFDD-9
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Walter, Andrea1, Author              
Rieger, Martina1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: action targets; action effects; motor control; visual-spatial action goals; movement kinematics; ideomotor theory
 Abstract: Previous research has shown that actions conducted toward temporal targets and temporal effects are controlled in a similar way. To investigate whether these findings also apply to spatially restricted movements we analyzed movement kinematics of continuous reversal movements toward given spatial targets and toward self-produced spatial effects in two experiments. In Experiment 1 target- and effect-directed movements were investigated in three different goal constellations. A spatial target/effect was always presented/produced on one movement side, on the other side either (a) no target/effect, (b) the same target/effect, or (c) a more difficult target/effect was presented/produced. Results showed that both target-directed and effect-directed movements have a typical spatial kinematic pattern and that both can be equally well described by linear functions as suggested by Fitts’ Law. However, effect-directed movements have longer movement times. In Experiment 2 participants performed target-directed movements to the one side and effect-directed movements to the other side of a reversal movement. More pronounced spatial kinematics were observed in effect-directed than in target-directed movements. Together, the results suggest that actions conducted toward spatial targets and spatial effects are controlled in a similar manner. Gradual differences in the kinematic patterns may arise because effects are cognitively more demanding. They may therefore be represented less accurately than targets. However, there was no indication of qualitative differences in the cognitive representations of effects and targets. This strengthens our assumption that both targets and effects play a comparable role in action control: they can both be viewed as goals of an action. Thus, ideomotor theories of action control should incorporate action targets as goals similar to action effects.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-06-262012-11-132012-12-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00539
PMID: 23230426
PMC: PMC3515765
Other: eCollection 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 Sequence Number: 539 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078