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  Effects of music listening on cortisol levels and propofol consumption during spinal anesthesia

Koelsch, S., Fuermetz, J., Sack, U., Bauer, K., Hohenadel, M., Wiegel, M., et al. (2011). Effects of music listening on cortisol levels and propofol consumption during spinal anesthesia. Frontiers in Psychology, 2: 58. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00058.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-F021-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-F022-8
Genre: Journal Article

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Koelsch_Fuermetz_2011.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
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 Creators:
Koelsch, Stefan1, 2, Author              
Fuermetz, Julian1, 2, Author
Sack, Ulrich 2, Author
Bauer, Katrin 2, Author
Hohenadel, Maximilian3, Author              
Wiegel, Martin 2, Author
Kaisers, Udo X. 2, Author
Heinke, Wolfgang 2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Neurocognition of Music, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634566              

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Free keywords: emotion; music; hormones; immunology; anesthesia; cortisol; IgA; ACTH
 Abstract: Background: This study explores effects of instrumental music on the hormonal system (as indicated by serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone), the immune system (as indicated by immunoglobulin A) and sedative drug requirements during surgery (elective total hip joint replacement under spinal anesthesia with light sedation). This is the first study investigating this issue with a double-blind design using instrumental music. Methodology/Principal Findings: Patients (n = 40) were randomly assigned either to a music group (listening to instrumental music), or to a control group (listening to a non-musical placebo stimulus). Both groups listened to the auditory stimulus about 2 h before, and during the entire intra-operative period (during the intra-operative light sedation, subjects were able to respond lethargically to verbal commands). Results indicate that, during surgery, patients of the music group had a lower propofol consumption, and lower cortisol levels, compared to the control group. Conclusion/Significance: Our data show that listening to music during surgery under regional anesthesia has effects on cortisol levels (reflecting stress-reducing effects) and reduces sedative requirements to reach light sedation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-02-202011-03-242011-04-05
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00058
PMC: PMC3110826
PMID: 21716581
Other: eCollection 2011
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 2 Sequence Number: 58 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078