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  Does neural synchrony predict behavioural synchrony in piano duos?

Gugnowska, K., Novembre, G., Keller, P. E., Villringer, A., & Sammler, D. (2019). Does neural synchrony predict behavioural synchrony in piano duos?. Poster presented at Language and Music in Cognition: Integrated Approaches to Cognitive Systems (Spring School 2019), University of Cologne, Germany.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-0E75-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-0E76-A
Genre: Poster

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 Creators:
Gugnowska, Katarzyna1, Author              
Novembre, Giacomo2, Author
Keller, Peter E.3, Author
Villringer, Arno4, Author              
Sammler, Daniela1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Otto Hahn Group Neural Bases of Intonation in Speech, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1797284              
2Neuroscience and Behaviour Laboratory, Italian Institute of Technology, ou_persistent22              
3The MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development, Western Sydney University , ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: interbrain synchrony; interpersonal coordination; ensemble music performance
 Abstract: Recent research has shown that interpersonal synchrony is accompanied by interbrain synchrony as shown by a substantial body of research (eg. Tognoli et al. 2007, Dumas et al. 2010). However, it remains unclear if interbrain synchrony stems from neural entrainment to shared sensorimotor input or is caused by the similarity of endogenous processes that enhance subsequent interpersonal coordination. Recent studies addressed this question, by investigating interbrain synchrony during action planning, that is without sensorimotor input (Mu et al. 2016, Novembre et al. 2017). Both studies showed that neural synchrony prior to a joint action onset in the alpha (Mu et al. 2016) or beta band (Novembre et al. 2017) was associated with better behavioural synchrony. The present dual-EEG study extends this line of research to a natural interaction, which is joint music making and the temporal precision of joint entries. It explores interbrain synchrony in all five frequency bands reported in the dual-EEG literature on interpersonal coordination, i.e., delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma (Lindenberger et al. 2009, Müller et al. 2013) and their role in predicting future behavioural coordination. The current study investigated if interbrain synchrony during joint action planning predicts the synchrony of the subsequent action onset.

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 Dates: 2019-02-05
 Publication Status: Not specified
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Title: Language and Music in Cognition: Integrated Approaches to Cognitive Systems (Spring School 2019)
Place of Event: University of Cologne, Germany
Start-/End Date: 2019-02-02 - 2019-02-08

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