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  Terrestrial Origin for Abundant Riverine Nanoscale Ice-Nucleating Particles

Knackstedt, K. A., Moffett, B. F., Hartmann, S., Wex, H., Hill, T. C. J., Glasgo, E. D., et al. (2018). Terrestrial Origin for Abundant Riverine Nanoscale Ice-Nucleating Particles. Environmental Science & Technology, 52(21), 12358-12367. doi:10.1021/acs.est.8b03881.

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 Creators:
Knackstedt, Kathryn A.1, Author
Moffett, Bruce F.1, Author
Hartmann, Susan1, Author
Wex, Heike1, Author
Hill, Thomas C. J.1, Author
Glasgo, Elizabeth D.1, Author
Reitz, Laura A.1, Author
Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie1, Author
Beall, Benjamin F. N.1, Author
Bullerjahn, George S.1, Author
Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine2, Author           
Grawe, Sarah1, Author
Lubitz, Jasmin1, Author
Stratmann, Frank1, Author
McKay, Robert Michael L.1, Author
Affiliations:
1external, ou_persistent22              
2Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826290              

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 Abstract: Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) associated with fresh waters are a neglected, but integral component of the water cycle. Abundant INPs were identified from surface waters of both the Maumee River and Lake Erie with ice nucleus spectra spanning a temperature range from −3 to −15 °C. The majority of river INPs were submicron in size and attributed to biogenic macromolecules, inferred from the denaturation of ice-nucleation activity by heat. In a watershed dominated by row-crop agriculture, higher concentrations of INPs were found in river samples compared to lake samples. Further, ice-nucleating temperatures differed between river and lake samples, which indicated different populations of INPs. Seasonal analysis of INPs that were active at warmer temperatures (≥−10 °C; INP–10) showed their concentration to correlate with river discharge, suggesting a watershed origin of these INPs. A terrestrial origin for INPs in the Maumee River was further supported by a correspondence between the ice-nucleation signatures of river INPs and INPs derived from the soil fungus Mortierella alpina. Aerosols derived from turbulence features in the river carry INP–10, although their potential influence on regional weather is unclear. INP–10 contained within aerosols generated from a weir spanning the river, ranged in concentration from 1 to 11 INP m–3, which represented a fold-change of 3.2 over average INP–10 concentrations sampled from aerosols at control locations.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000449722200040
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.8b03881
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Title: Environmental Science & Technology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Easton, PA : American Chemical Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 52 (21) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 12358 - 12367 Identifier: ISSN: 0013-936X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954921342157