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  Measuring single neuron visual receptive field sizes by fMRI

Keliris, G., Li, Q., Papanikolaou, A., Logothetis, N., & Smirnakis, S. (submitted). Measuring single neuron visual receptive field sizes by fMRI.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-0569-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-95B2-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Keliris, GA1, 2, Author              
Li, Q1, 2, Author              
Papanikolaou, A1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Smirnakis, SM, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The non-invasive measurements of neuronal receptive field (RF) properties in-vivo allow a detailed understanding of brain organization as well as its plasticity by longitudinal following of potential changes. Visual RFs measured invasively by electrophysiology in animal models have traditionally provided a great extent of our current knowledge about the visual brain and its disorders. Voxel based estimates of population RF (pRF) by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans revolutionized the field and have been used extensively in numerous studies. However, current methods cannot estimate single-neuron RF sizes as they reflect large populations of neurons with individual RF scatter. Here, we introduce a new approach to estimate RF size using spatial frequency selectivity to checkerboard patterns. This method allowed us to obtain non-invasive, single-unit, RF estimates in human V1 for the first time. These estimates were significantly smaller compared to prior pRF methods. Further, fMRI and electrophysiological experiments in non-human primates demonstrated an exceptional match validating the approach.

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 Dates: 2018-04
 Publication Status: Submitted
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/301648
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