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  Brain-to-brain synchrony and learning outcomes vary by student-teacher dynamics: Evidence from a real-world classroom electroencephalography study

Bevilacqua, D., Davidesco, I., Wan, L., Chaloner, K., Rowland, J., Ding, M., et al. (2019). Brain-to-brain synchrony and learning outcomes vary by student-teacher dynamics: Evidence from a real-world classroom electroencephalography study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 31(3), 401-411. doi:10.1162/jocn_a_01274.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-14C1-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-14C2-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bevilacqua, Dana1, Author
Davidesco, Ido1, Author
Wan, Lu2, Author
Chaloner, Kim3, Author
Rowland, Jess1, 4, Author
Ding, Mingzhou2, Author
Poeppel, David1, 5, Author              
Dikker, Suzanne1, 6, Author
Affiliations:
1New York University, NY 10003 USA, ou_persistent22              
2University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA, ou_persistent22              
3Grace Church School, New York, NY, New York, NY USA, ou_persistent22              
4School of Visual Arts, New York, NY, New York, NY 10010 USA, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2421697              
6Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: EEG; OSCILLATIONS; ATTENTION; SPEAKER; SPEECH; MECHANISM; PATTERNS; TRACKING; CORTEX
 Abstract: How does the human brain support real-world learning? We used wireless electroencephalography to collect neurophysiological data from a group of 12 senior high school students and their teacher during regular biology lessons. Six scheduled classes over the course of the semester were organized such that class materials were presented using different teaching styles (videos and lectures), and students completed a multiple-choice quiz after each class to measure their retention of that lesson's content. Both students' brain-to-brain synchrony and their content retention were higher for videos than lectures across the six classes. Brain-to-brain synchrony between the teacher and students varied as a function of student engagement as well as teacher likeability: Students who reported greater social closeness to the teacher showed higher brain-to-brain synchrony with the teacher, but this was only the case for lectures-that is, when the teacher is an integral part of the content presentation. Furthermore, students' retention of the class content correlated with student-teacher closeness, but not with brain-to-brain synchrony. These findings expand on existing social neuroscience research by showing that social factors such as perceived closeness are reflected in brain-to-brain synchrony in real-world group settings and can predict cognitive outcomes such as students' academic performance.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-01-302019-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: ISI: 000457547500006
DOI: 10.1162/jocn_a_01274
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, MA : MIT Press Journals
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 401 - 411 Identifier: ISSN: 0898-929X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042752752726