English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A microfluidic split-flow technology for product characterization in continuous low-volume nanoparticle synthesis.

Bolze, H., Erfle, P., Riewe, J., Bunjes, H., Dietzel, A., & Burg, T. P. (2019). A microfluidic split-flow technology for product characterization in continuous low-volume nanoparticle synthesis. Micromachines, 10(3): 179. doi:10.3390/mi10030179.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-278F-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-2792-C
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
3032700.pdf (Publisher version), 7MB
Name:
3032700.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Bolze, H.1, Author              
Erfle, P., Author
Riewe, J., Author
Bunjes, H., Author
Dietzel, A., Author
Burg, T. P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Biological Micro- and Nanotechnology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578602              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: fluorescence; lipid nanoparticles; microfluidics; nanoparticle characterization; online analysis; plug flow mixer; precipitation; single particle analysis
 Abstract: A key aspect of microfluidic processes is their ability to perform chemical reactions in small volumes under continuous flow. However, a continuous process requires stable reagent flow over a prolonged period. This can be challenging in microfluidic systems, as bubbles or particles easily block or alter the flow. Online analysis of the product stream can alleviate this problem by providing a feedback signal. When this signal exceeds a pre-defined range, the process can be re-adjusted or interrupted to prevent contamination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by implementing a microfluidic detector downstream of a segmented-flow system for the synthesis of lipid nanoparticles. To match the flow rate through the detector to the measurement bandwidth independent of the synthesis requirements, a small stream is sidelined from the original product stream and routed through a measuring channel with 2 × 2 µm cross-section. The small size of the measuring channel prevents the entry of air plugs, which are inherent to our segmented flow synthesis device. Nanoparticles passing through the small channel were detected and characterized by quantitative fluorescence measurements. With this setup, we were able to count single nanoparticles. This way, we were able to detect changes in the particle synthesis affecting the size, concentration, or velocity of the particles in suspension. We envision that the flow-splitting scheme demonstrated here can be transferred to detection methods other than fluorescence for continuous monitoring and feedback control of microfluidic nanoparticle synthesis.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-03-092019
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3390/mi10030179
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Micromachines
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 16 Volume / Issue: 10 (3) Sequence Number: 179 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -