English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Visual perception of one’s own body under vestibular stimulation using biometric self-avatars in virtual reality

Karnath, H.-O., Mölbert, S., Klaner, A., Tesch, J., Giel, K., Wong, H., et al. (2019). Visual perception of one’s own body under vestibular stimulation using biometric self-avatars in virtual reality. PLoS One, 14(3), 1-15. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213944.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-3522-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-3523-A
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Karnath, H-O, Author
Mölbert, SC1, 2, Author              
Klaner, AK, Author
Tesch, J1, 2, Author              
Giel, KE, Author
Wong, HY, Author
Mohler, BJ1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528693              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Vestibular input is projected to "multisensory (vestibular) cortex" where it converges with input from other sensory modalities. It has been assumed that this multisensory integration enables a continuous perception of state and presence of one's own body. The present study thus asked whether or not vestibular stimulation may impact this perception. METHODS: We used an immersive virtual reality setup to realistically manipulate the length of extremities of first person biometric avatars. Twenty-two healthy participants had to adjust arms and legs to their correct length from various start lengths before, during, and after vestibular stimulation. RESULTS: Neither unilateral caloric nor galvanic vestibular stimulation had a modulating effect on the perceived size of own extremities. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that vestibular stimulation does not directly influence the explicit somatosensory representation of our body. It is possible that in non-brain-damaged, healthy subjects, changes in whole body size perception are principally not mediated by vestibular information. Alternatively, visual feedback and/or memory may dominate multisensory integration and thereby override possibly existing modulations of body perception by vestibular stimulation. The present observations suggest that multisensory integration and not the processing of a single sensory input is the crucial mechanism in generating our body representation in relation to the external world.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2019-03
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0213944
eDoc: e0213944
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 15 Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850