English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Modeling and MEG evidence of early consonance processing in auditory cortex

Tabas, A., Andermann, M., Schuberth, V., Riedel, H., Balaguer-Ballester, E., & Rupp, A. (2019). Modeling and MEG evidence of early consonance processing in auditory cortex. PLoS Computational Biology, 15(2): e1006820. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006820.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Tabas_2019.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Tabas_2019.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Tabas, Alejandro1, 2, Author              
Andermann, Martin 3, Author
Schuberth, Valeria 3, Author
Riedel, Helmut 3, Author
Balaguer-Ballester, Emili 2, 4, Author
Rupp , André 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neurology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Heidelberg-Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Pitch is a fundamental attribute of auditory perception. The interaction of concurrent pitches gives rise to a sensation that can be characterized by its degree of consonance or dissonance. In this work, we propose that human auditory cortex (AC) processes pitch and consonance through a common neural network mechanism operating at early cortical levels. First, we developed a new model of neural ensembles incorporating realistic neuronal and synaptic parameters to assess pitch processing mechanisms at early stages of AC. Next, we designed a magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment to measure the neuromagnetic activity evoked by dyads with varying degrees of consonance or dissonance. MEG results show that dissonant dyads evoke a pitch onset response (POR) with a latency up to 36 ms longer than consonant dyads. Additionally, we used the model to predict the processing time of concurrent pitches; here, consonant pitch combinations were decoded faster than dissonant combinations, in line with the experimental observations. Specifically, we found a striking match between the predicted and the observed latency of the POR as elicited by the dyads. These novel results suggest that consonance processing starts early in human auditory cortex and may share the network mechanisms that are responsible for (single) pitch processing.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-07-062019-01-242019-02-28
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006820
PMID: 30818358
Other: eCollection 2019
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Bournemouth University Studentships Program
Funding organization : Bournemouth University

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS Computational Biology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 15 (2) Sequence Number: e1006820 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1553-734X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000017180_1