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  Spinal CSF flow in response to forced thoracic and abdominal respiration.

Aktas, G., Kollmeier, J. M., Joseph, A. A., Merboldt, K. D., Ludwig, H. C., Gärtner, J., et al. (2019). Spinal CSF flow in response to forced thoracic and abdominal respiration. Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, 16(1): 10. doi:10.1186/s12987-019-0130-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5577-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-557A-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Aktas, G., Author
Kollmeier, J. M.1, Author              
Joseph, A. A.1, Author              
Merboldt, K. D.1, Author              
Ludwig, H. C., Author
Gärtner, J., Author
Frahm, J.1, Author              
Dreha-Kulaczewski, S., Author
Affiliations:
1Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578634              

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Free keywords: CSF dynamics; Flow-sensitive real-time MRI; Hydrocephalus; Intraabdominal pressure; Intrathoracic pressure; Respiration
 Abstract: BACKGROUND: Respiration-induced pressure changes represent a powerful driving force of CSF dynamics as previously demonstrated using flow-sensitive real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the sensitivity of CSF flow along the spinal canal to forced thoracic versus abdominal respiration. METHODS: Eighteen subjects without known illness were studied using real-time phase-contrast flow MRI at 3 T in the aqueduct and along the spinal canal at levels C3, Th1, Th8 and L3. Subjects performed a protocol of forced breathing comprising four cycles of 2.5 s inspiration and 2.5 s expiration. RESULTS: The quantitative results for spinal CSF flow rates and volumes confirm previous findings of an upward movement during forced inspiration and reversed downward flow during subsequent exhalation-for both breathing types. However, the effects were more pronounced for abdominal than for thoracic breathing, in particular at spinal levels Th8 and L3. In general, CSF net flow volumes were very similar for both breathing conditions pointing upwards in all locations. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal CSF dynamics are sensitive to varying respiratory performances. The different CSF flow volumes in response to deep thoracic versus abdominal breathing reflect instantaneous adjustments of intrathoracic and intraabdominal pressure, respectively. Real-time MRI access to CSF flow in response to defined respiration patterns will be of clinical importance for patients with disturbed CSF circulation like hydrocephalus, pseudotumor cerebri and others.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-04-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1186/s12987-019-0130-0
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Title: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 8 Volume / Issue: 16 (1) Sequence Number: 10 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -