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  Bi-directional Control of Walking Behavior by Horizontal Optic Flow Sensors

Busch, C., Borst, A., & Mauss, A. S. (2018). Bi-directional Control of Walking Behavior by Horizontal Optic Flow Sensors. Current Biology, 28(24), 4037-4045.e5. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.11.010.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-69D5-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-69D6-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Busch, Christian1, Author              
Borst, Alexander1, Author              
Mauss, Alex S.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department: Circuits-Computation-Models / Borst, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1113548              

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Free keywords: VISUAL INTERNEURONS; OPTOGENETIC CONTROL; SELF-MOTION; FLY; NEURONS; FLIES; SELECTIVITY; LOCOMOTION; MOVEMENT; CIRCUITSBiochemistry & Molecular Biology; Cell Biology;
 Abstract: Moving animals experience constant sensory feedback, such as panoramic image shifts on the retina, termed optic flow. Underlying neuronal signals are thought to be important for exploratory behavior by signaling unintended course deviations and by providing spatial information about the environment [1, 2]. Particularly in insects, the encoding of self-motion-related optic flow is well understood [1-5]. However, a gap remains in understanding how the associated neuronal activity controls locomotor trajectories. In flies, visual projection neurons belonging to two groups encode panoramic horizontal motion: horizontal system (HS) cells respond with depolarization to front-to-back motion and hyperpolarization to the opposite direction [6, 7], and other neurons have the mirror-symmetrical response profile [6, 8, 9]. With primarily monocular sensitivity, the neurons' responses are ambiguous for different rotational and translational self-movement components. Such ambiguities can be greatly reduced by combining signals from both eyes [10-12] to determine turning and movement speed [13-16]. Here, we explore the underlying functional logic by optogenetic HS cell manipulation in tethered walking Drosophila. We show that de- and hyperpolarization evoke opposite turning behavior, indicating that both direction-selective signals are transmitted to descending pathways for course control. Further experiments reveal a negative effect of bilaterally symmetric de-and hyperpolarization on walking velocity. Our results are therefore consistent with a functional architecture in which the HS cells' membrane potential influences walking behavior bi-directionally via two decelerating pathways.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 14
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000453543800034
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.11.010
 Degree: -

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Project name : SFB 870
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation

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Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 28 (24) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4037 - 4045.e5 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107