English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Crowding in the first intermediate host does not affect infection probability in the second host in two helminths

Benesh, D. P. (2019). Crowding in the first intermediate host does not affect infection probability in the second host in two helminths. Journal of Helminthology, 93(2), 172-176. doi:10.1017/S0022149X1800007X.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-6F13-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-6F14-B
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
benesh2018.pdf (Publisher version), 189KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
benesh2018.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Benesh, D. P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: When many worms co-infect the same host, their average size is often reduced. This negative density-dependent growth is called the crowding effect. Crowding has been reported many times for worms in their intermediate hosts, but rarely have the fitness consequences of crowding been examined. This study tested whether larval crowding reduces establishment success in the next host for two parasites with complex life cycles, the nematode Camallanus lacustris and the cestode Schistocephalus solidus. Infected copepods, the first host, were fed to sticklebacks, the second host. Fish received a constant dose, but the infection intensity in copepods was varied (e.g. giving two singly infected copepods or one doubly infected copepod). Worms from higher-intensity infections did not have significantly reduced infection success in fish. However, crowded treatments had a disproportionate number of low and high infection rates, and although this trend was not significant, it hints at the possibility that multiple worms within a copepod are more likely to either all infect or all die when transmitted to the next host. These results indicate that a smaller larval size due to crowding need not reduce the establishment probability of a worm in the next host.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-11-272018-01-052018-02-142019-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1017/S0022149X1800007X
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Helminthology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 93 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 172 - 176 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-149X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110992357251620