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  KIC 2568888: To Be or Not to Be a Binary

Themeßl, N., Hekker, S., Mints, A., García, R. A., García Saravia Ortíz de Montellano, A., Stetson, P. B., et al. (2018). KIC 2568888: To Be or Not to Be a Binary. The Astrophysical Journal, 868(2): 103. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aae846.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7572-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7573-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Themeßl, Nathalie1, Author              
Hekker, Saskia1, Author              
Mints, Alexey1, Author              
García, R. A., Author
García Saravia Ortíz de Montellano, Andrés1, Author              
Stetson, P. B., Author
Ridder, J. De, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group in Stellar Ages and Galactic Evolution (SAGE), Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2265636              

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 Abstract: In cases where both components of a binary system show oscillations, asteroseismology has been proposed as a method to identify the system. For KIC 2568888, observed with Kepler, we detect oscillation modes for two red giants in a single power-density spectrum. Through an asteroseismic study we investigate if the stars have similar properties, which could be an indication that they are physically bound into a binary system. While one star lies on the red giant branch (RGB), the other, more evolved star, is either a RGB or asymptotic giant branch star. We found similar ages for the red giants and a mass ratio close to 1. Based on these asteroseismic results, we propose KIC 2568888 as a rare candidate binary system (~0.1% chance). However, when combining the asteroseismic data with ground-based BVI photometry we estimated different distances for the stars, which we cross-checked with Gaia DR2. From Gaia we obtained for one object a distance between and broadly consistent with the distances from BVI photometry. For the other object we have a negative parallax with a not yet reliable Gaia distance solution. The derived distances challenge a binary interpretation and may either point to a triple system, which could explain the visible magnitudes, or, to a rare chance alignment (~0.05% chance based on stellar magnitudes). This probability would even be smaller, if calculated for close pairs of stars with a mass ratio close to unity in addition to similar magnitudes, which may indeed indicate that a binary scenario is more favorable.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-04-242018
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/aae846
 Degree: -

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Title: The Astrophysical Journal
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Bristol; Vienna : IOP Publishing; IAEA
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 868 (2) Sequence Number: 103 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0004-637X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922828215_3