English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The influence of saccadic eye movements on neural activity in the temporal lobe

Ovaysikia, S., Bartlett, A., Logothetis, N., & Hoffman, K. (2008). The influence of saccadic eye movements on neural activity in the temporal lobe. Poster presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2008), Washington, DC, USA.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ovaysikia, S, Author
Bartlett, AM, Author
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Hoffman, KL1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: The responses of cells in the temporal lobe to faces and objects has been the topic of extensive research; however, the eye movement constraints during these experiments varies considerably. Some require central eye fixation during image presentation, whereas others allow unconstrained viewing of stimuli. Here, we explore the influence of saccadic eye movements on neural responses in the temporal lobe. Awake macaques were presented with a set of objects or faces while we recorded simultaneously from neurons in the upper-bank of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and in the auditory cortex. Responses during three categories of saccades were evaluated: 1) those occurring prior to fixation onset (spontaneous saccades), 2) those made at the time of central cue fixation (visually-guided saccades) and 3) saccades made during scanning of an image (image-guided saccades). Saccade modulation was observed for all categories of saccades, though not always in the same cells, and irrespective of a cell’s image selectivity. Single unit responses typically occurred during negative components of the local field potential (LFP). Whereas broad peri-saccadic modulation was seen in both STS and auditory cortex, only cells in STS showed precise, short-latency responses at the termination of a saccade. The results of our study demonstrate that even those cells that respond to face and object stimuli can show modulation to eye movements. In addition, saccade modulation is not limited to classically-defined image-responsive regions of the brain: broad peri-saccadic modulation was also observed in auditory cortex. The observation that actions can influence sensory responses will be considered within the framework of embodied cognition.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2008-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 38th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2008)
Place of Event: Washington, DC, USA
Start-/End Date: 2008-11-15 - 2008-11-19

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 38th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2008)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 261.17 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -