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  Wide sensory filters underlie performance in memory-based discrimination and generalization

Chen, C., Krueger-Burg, D., & de Hoz, L. (2019). Wide sensory filters underlie performance in memory-based discrimination and generalization. PLoS One, 14(4): e0214817. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0214817.

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 Creators:
Chen, Chi1, Author           
Krueger-Burg, Dilja2, Author           
de Hoz, Livia3, Author           
Affiliations:
1Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Max Planck Society, ou_2173664              
2Molecular neurobiology, Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Max Planck Society, ou_2173659              
3Cognitive Neurophysiology Lab, Department of Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The way animals respond to a stimulus depends largely on an internal comparison between the current sensation and the memory of previous stimuli and outcomes. We know little about the accuracy with which the physical properties of the stimuli influence this type of memory- based discriminative decisions. Research has focused largely on discriminations between sti- muli presented in quick succession, where animals can make relative inferences (same or dif- ferent; higher or lower) from trial to trial. In the current study we used a memory-based task to explore how the stimulus’ physical properties, in this case tone frequency, affect auditory dis- crimination and generalization in mice. Mice performed ad libitum while living in groups in their home quarters. We found that the frequency distance between safe and conditioned sounds had a constraining effect on discrimination. As the safe-to-conditioned distance decreased across groups, performance deteriorated rapidly, even for frequency differences significantly larger than reported discrimination thresholds. Generalization width was influ- enced both by the physical distance and the previous experience of the mice, and was not accompanied by a decrease in sensory acuity. In conclusion, memory-based discriminations along a single stimulus dimension are inherently hard, reflecting a high overlap between the memory traces of the relevant stimuli. Memory-based discriminations rely therefore on wide sensory filters.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-03-202019-04-18
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 29
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0214817
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: 29 Volume / Issue: 14 (4) Sequence Number: e0214817 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850