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  Children, but not great apes, respect ownership

Kanngiesser, P., Rossano, F., Frickel, R., Tomm, A., & Tomasello, M. (2020). Children, but not great apes, respect ownership. Developmental Science, 23(1): e12842. doi:10.1111/desc.12842.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-BF3A-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-5B4A-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kanngiesser, Patricia, Author
Rossano, Federico, Author
Frickel, Ramona1, Author              
Tomm, Anne1, Author              
Tomasello, Michael1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497671              

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Free keywords: apes; children; conflict; cooperation; ownership; social behaviour
 Abstract: Abstract Access to and control of resources is a major source of costly conflicts. Animals, under some conditions, respect what others control and use (i.e. possession). Humans not only respect possession of resources, they also respect ownership. Ownership can be viewed as a cooperative arrangement, where individuals inhibit their tendency to take others’ property on the condition that those others will do the same. We investigated to what degree great apes follow this principle, as compared to human children. We conducted two experiments, in which dyads of individuals could access the same food resources. The main test of respect for ownership was whether individuals would refrain from taking their partner's resources even when the partner could not immediately access and control them. Captive apes (N = 14 dyads) failed to respect their partner's claim on food resources and frequently monopolized the resources when given the opportunity. Human children (N = 14 dyads), tested with a similar apparatus and procedure, respected their partner's claim and made spontaneous verbal references to ownership. Such respect for the property of others highlights the uniquely cooperative nature of human ownership arrangements.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-04-302020-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 13
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/desc.12842
 Degree: -

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Title: Developmental Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Hoboken, New Jersey : Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (1) Sequence Number: e12842 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1467-7687
ISSN: 1363-755X